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Rug Cleaning

The Top Five Rugs Stains and How to Address Them

 Number one – Pet Urine

•    If you discover pet urine while it is still wet, blot the area with a clean, white cloth to remove the excess.
•    Dilute the area with water and blot with a clean, white cloth (please don’t rub) until no more color is visible on your cloth.
•    Next we would suggest having your rug professionally cleaned.  Untreated pet urine can lead to permanent stains and bacteria growth.
•    If you cannot have your rug professionally cleaned, then use an enzymatic cleaner to remove the stain and the scent.

•    Typically we recommend having your rugs professionally cleaned every 12 – 18 months, but you may want to do it more often if you have pets.

 

Number two – Pet Poo

•    We recommend wearing a pair of rubber gloves when dealing with this mess.  
•    Remove and dispose of any solids.
•    Use plain, white paper towel to remove as much of the remaining residue as possible.  Try not to smear it.
•    Clean the area with cold water and a pH neutral detergent, like Woolite.  Use a clean, white cloth and don’t rub or scrub too firmly.
•    If you try a store-bought spray cleaner, be sure to test it first in an unnoticeable area to make sure there is no dye bleeding.
•    Rinse the area thoroughly and then blot dry with a dry, clean, white cloth.
•    If the area is exceptionally wet, set up a fan to help it dry more quickly.

 

Number three – Red Wine, Number four – Kool Aid, and Number five – Soda

The method of attack on all of these is similar, so we will address them together.  Red wine and Kool Aid are especially difficult to remove.  On these two, we recommend calling a trusted professional, but if you choose to work on it, then we recommend a similar plan of action as with a soda spill.

•    Blot the area with a clean, white cloth or paper towel to remove the excess.
•    Next, clean the area with cold water and a pH neutral detergent, like Woolite.  Use a clean, white cloth and take care to not rub or scrub the area.
•    If the soapy water doesn’t work, then try a store-bought spray cleaner.  Be sure to test it first in an inconspicuous area to check for dye bleeding.  Use caution if you choose an oxygenating spotting product; these are made from diluted hydrogen peroxide.  If the area isn’t thoroughly rinsed, the product will remain and eventually bleach the color from your rug.
•    Rinse the area thoroughly using a clean white cloth and plain water.  Blot dry with a clean, white towel.
•    If the area is exceptionally wet, set up a fan to help it dry more quickly.

•    If the stain remains after the spray cleaner, then stop and call a professional.  Doing too much can actually cause you to permanently damage the fibers.

 

While these suggestions may work on many spills or mishaps, keep in mind that the results could vary.  We suggest that you call a professional rug cleaner for deep or set-in stains.